Browse Biographies

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Amos, Hope, 1811 - 1872

Hope Amos was born September 6, 1811, the daughter of Elisha and Bathsheba Amos.  As a young woman, she was a signatory to a January 1834 Mashpee petition written by William Apes.   Despite being away from Mashpee, Amos' name was added to that of 288 other Mashpee residents and community members raising a number of longstanding grievances against the overseers and the Congregational missionary to the tribe.  Shortly after the signing of the petition, Hope Amos married John Mashow and very soon after their daughter Mary F.

Amos, Hebzibah (1805)

Hepzibah Amos was a member of the Christiantown Indian tribe, and the wife of Francis Peters.  In 1805, she and other members of the community, protested strangers getting access to the property formerly of David Capey.   Petition of Solomon Weeks, 1805.01.26.00

Amos, David (1834 Apes Petition)

Mashpee resident, David R. Amos, was a signatory to a January 1834 Mashpee petition written by William Apes.   Amos' name was added to that of 288 other Mashpee residents and community members complaining of a number of longstanding grievances against the overseers and the Congregational missionary to the tribe.  Petition of the Mashpee Indians to the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 1834.01.29.00

Amos, Daniel, 1803 -

Born circa 1803, Daniel B. Amos was to become one of the Mashpee community's significant political figures in the 1830s and 1840s, serving as town clerk and as one of the selectmen for a number of years.  As a young man, he was prominently involved in the tribe's efforts to re-establish more autonomy over the community.

Amos, Anna (1805)

Anna Amos was most likely the daughter of Israel Amos and Rachel Coshomon of Christiantown, Massachusetts.  She first married Joseph Tackenash of Sanchekantacket, Massachusetts and, second, around 1798, George Peters.  The couple had the following children: Samuel, Louisa, Rachel, George, Amos, Asa, Hepzibah, Joseph, Leander, and Charles. Pierce and Segel, Wampanoag Families of Martha's Vineyard, 733, 737-738.

 

Amoakisson

Amoakisson, alias Nacogewallant, was the owner of a track of land at the northeast side of the Worrinoke River.  He and his wife mortgaged the property to Springfield's Thomas Cooper to secure a debt of twelve pounds in 1660. Amoakission later sold the property to Cooper in the fall of 1664.  Wright, Indian Deeds of Hampden County, 40-42.  36.  Alice Nash, "Quanquan's Mortgage of 1663," in Marla R. Miller, ed., Cultivating a Past: Essays on the History of Hadley, Massachusetts (Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts Press, 2009), 36.

Alyne, John

John Alyne was a leader of the Wamesit as early as 1675 as part of an order allowing the Wamesit to collect their harvest during King Philip's War.  His name later appears on a deed in as part of Wanalancet's Council in 1714.  Waters, History of Chelmsford, 105. Coburn, History of Lowell, 46-48.

Allen, William H.

William H. Allen was a descendant of Lurana Sepit.  In 1843, he with two other family members petitioned the Massachusetts General Court to look into where the proceeds of the sale of Sepit's land were.  Petition of Augustus Casey, 1843.01.18.00

Ahaton, Amos

Amos Ahaton (d. by 1768) was a Native proprietor and minister to his community at Ponkapoag in Canton, Massachusetts from 1717-1743.  His name was in a 1725 petition by the tribe wishing to sell part of their land to John Wentworth and others.  He was involved in a controversy between William Sherman and Benjamin and Moses Gill in 1737.  In 1768, his descendants claimed that their lands were gradually being taken away from them.  Weis, "The New England Company of 1649," 151. MA 31: 122-125; 33: 468-469; 42: 188.

Ahaton II, Thomas

Thomas Ahaton was a Ponkapoag proprietor of lands in Dorchester, Massachusetts.  In 1725, he and some other Ponkapoags deeded land to John Wentworth, one of the Indian tenants. John Wentworth, The Wentworth Genealogy, Vol. 1 (Boston, MA: Little, Brown, and Company, 1878), 192.